A new, and wonderful, Christmas story

From my old childhood favorite

Every Who down in Who-ville likes Christmas a lot, but the Grinch who lived just north of Whoville did NOT!   — Dr Seuss, How the Grinch Stole Christmas

A Chistmas present from Faisal is not be missed.

“I want to make this the best I can for them”

While the Man dithers in the aftermath of the Camp Fire, trying to get his sh*t togther, the Little Folks get it

I say “That seems like a thankless task.”

“Not at all,” she replies. “Not at all.”

“Really? Why the hell not?”

“Hey, I do this job every day in this store. It’s my assigned task and usually its okay but I only do it for the money because it gets really monotonous, meaningless.”

She’s a student, I perceive.

“But today those people really needed these clothes in this corner because of the price. And tomorrow more people like that will really need them too. And so I want to make this the best I can for them. So I’m going to put it all back on hangers and arrange them by size. It will be right by the morning. You better go. We’re closing. Thank you for coming in.”

Our-Savior-Lutheran-Church-in-Paradise

Straight from the (slightly toasted) horse’s mouth at American Digest.  Stop by and drop off a tip, so he can rebuild his life.

“This is the greatest country in the world.”

An American veteran brings his Ukranian bride to the States for a honeymoon, and gets to see his country through fresh eyes.  And understands why not to sweat the small stuff:

…it’s all too easy to misjudge the gravity of life’s problems when you’re used to peace and prosperity—after all, there’s no microaggression, no trigger, no slur or verbal insult that could ever compare with the impartial brutalities of revolution and war.

Tip from Maggie’s Farm

UPDATE:  A young German woman, disillusioned with her life, is rescued from death by a kindly stranger.

As for Katharina, she said Nancy rescued her in more ways than one.

“Someone cared,” Katharina said.  She said the whole reason she did the hike alone was because she’d given up on people.

“I lost faith in humanity,” Katharina said.  But she said she got her faith back in a “really big way.”

“Come to America,” Katharina said.

Making America GLAMOROUS Again

Since Christmas, the oh-so-woke fashion and lifestyle press has aggressively ignored first lady Melania Trump.  Unlike her husband, she doesn’t bluster, tweet, or speechify; instead she speaks in the language of fashion.  For French President Macron’s state visit, she wore this:

ThatHat

Impossible to be ignored. The Washington Post’s Robin Givhan writes

On these official occasions, the first lady sometimes appears to be dressing for a fashion-shoot version of the event — a kind of heightened reality of an already rather surreal circumstance. But there is also the sense that she is stubbornly and confidently dressing up and refusing to relax into today’s accepted decorum. The result is that she sometimes seems to have a tin ear for empathetic dressing. And sometimes, she wears a hat, which, for women, long ago ceased being about fashion in this country and became more of an affectation, whether it be the religiosity of Sunday church service or the self-conscious flamboyance of the Kentucky Derby.

A hat is a celebration of oneself. It is about presenting one’s most adorned, spit-shined, upright self to God, social media or, in this case, the history books.

“Empathetic dressing?”  What kind of woke bullshit is that?  “Today’s accepted decorum” is sweatpants or basketball jerseys at a wedding reception, t-shirts at a funeral, and airheads in phony ripped jeans; grown men don’t even own a suit to be buried in.  Melania Trump reminds us that sometimes clothes do make the man; that we can be our very best selves.

The best part? “Taxpayers do not pay for the first lady’s wardrobe.”

KWIC, make me some hash!

IEEE Spectrum has a fascinating bio sketch of Hans Peter Luhn, inventor of the hashing and KWIC indexing algorithms.

HansPeterLuhn

This is Luhn’s legacy: He helped show that computers and computation weren’t just the province of mathematics, statistics, and logic but also of language, linguistics, and literature. In his day, this was a revolutionary way to think about machines.

Tip from the Geek Press.