Everybody can do something better than you can

Rachel DiCarlo Currie explains Why We Need a Revival of Humility.  Here’s the money quote

Shortly before leaving the Senate, Kyl spoke to Fred Barnes of The Weekly Standard and described a childhood trip to his local county fair in Iowa. Upon arriving at the fair, Kyl said, his father made sure that he saw the man who managed parking for the attendees. “He does that better than anyone else,” his father told him. “Everybody can do something better than you can.”

Everybody can do something better than you can. Imagine how much different our society would be if each of us embraced those words as a daily mantra.

That’s why I don’t tell the plumber, the tile guy, the yard guy, the pool guy, or my mechanic how to do his job.  If I was so friggin’ smart, why would I be paying these guys?

Tip from the Instapundit, where Sarah Hoyt has been on a roll lately.  Must be ’cause she just finished another novel.

Revealed, a True Romantic for the New Century

This man

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said this: “I will fight for you with every breath in my body – and I will never, ever let you down.”

If that’s not romantic, I don’t know what is.

Update:  Shane Bouvet is an under-employed FedEx courier and Trump campaigner who scored a ticket to the inauguration, but had to scrounge a suit and shoes.  This Man read that story, and showed what a sweetheart he is.  (Tip from the Instapundit, who doesn’t do fake news.)

Bob Dylan and the Nobel Prize

Everybody’s got an opinion on this one, and here’s a doozy:

The Nobel Prize is in fact the ultimate example of bad faith: A small group of Swedish critics pretend to be the voice of God, and the public pretends that the Nobel winner is Literature incarnate. … Mr. Dylan may yet accept the prize, but so far, his refusal to accept the authority of the Swedish Academy has been a wonderful demonstration of what real artistic and philosophical freedom looks like.

Art Meets Science

On a day that I’m overbooked, running around campus doing minor, but essential chores, and feeling a bit grumpy about the whole academic enterprise, I stumble upon a jewel like this:

Not in a gallery or the administration building, but in a hallway between classrooms.  Where thousands of students, and the odd faculty member, can marvel at what talents sometimes pop up where we least expect them.

The Invention of Nature

I’m neck deep in Andrea Wulf‘s biography of Alexander von Humboldt, and it’s absolutely riveting.  Von Humboldt was some kind of scientific maniac, who caught the interest of everyone from Goethe to Thomas Jefferson to Simon Bolivar.  Von Humboldt was arguably the first naturalist to think ecologically, as well as one of the earliest abolitionists.  He didn’t get to go everywhere, and he didn’t get to meet everyone, but damn close.

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The Examined Life is Worth Living

Scurrilous Commentator Fred Reed demonstrates how a grown-up examines his prejudices on the way to wisdom

Most Latinos of the south are either a mixture of Spanish and Indian, or sometimes pure Indian….Are they, as nativists insist, of very low IQ–83–and have they enstupidated the Spanish? Horrendously primitive?

Without thinking about it, I had the entrenched idea that they were just that. I wasn’t conscious that it was either an idea or entrenched–just a fact. It didn’t occur to me that I knew virtually nothing about these  people, or that there was anything to know.

What pulled me up short was their architecture.

and gives us a cultural history lesson along the way.

Maya-city

Included is this wonderful link to the Mayan numbering system, which makes ours look a bit rickety.

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